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Week One
August 31, 1998 - September 4, 1998

Introduction to Rescue


Day Four

Subject: CLASS: approaching animal control
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 1998 13:11:18 -0500
From "Rebecca A. Knittle" - Rebecca.A.Knittle-1@tc.umn.edu

Hello, Fellow Class members. I live in St. Paul, MN, and am considering getting involved in kuvasz rescue.

How does a person go about approaching animal control or other shelters? Do rescue people regularly visit such shelters and/or rely on the shelter contact you about a particular dog? What kinds of policies do shelters typically have?

How do you go about developing possible permanent placements for rescued dogs?

There aren't many kuvaszok in this area that I know of, so it's not as if a whole organization will be involved.

What are the best ways to develop expertise in all aspects of one breed's behavior, so that you can do an adequate evaluation of the dog?

Thanks very much for the class.

Rebecca Knittle
kuvasz
knitt001@tc.umn.edu


Subject: Re: CLASS: Getting started
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 1998 09:39:21 -0400
From: Mary JC Smith - lawns@earthlink.net

Hi All,

Myself, and four other local breeders ( all different breeds), have been attempting to start our own rescue. I have to admit I'm stumped as to where to begin. I will attempt to be brief about what I have found out so far, which really isn't much. Read brick walls, and good ole boy syndrome!!! We are in Cumberland County, North Carolina BTW.

In my county we have 1 *high* Kill animal shelter, 1 SPCA, and 1 no Kill animal shelter. We also have the animal shelter on Ft. Bragg, which takes animals only from service members, and strays picked up on post. So far I have only located 5 individuals doing breed specific rescue in our area, I'm one and the four other breeders are the rest of us. I have been assured by the local no kill shelter, that there is a *VAST* need for help in this area. The lady who runs the local SPCA, to state it kindly is a Loon, and all animals are hers!! She doesn't answer her phone, she doesn't answer messages, and she has no known hours of operation that are viable. I spoke with the director of the local animal control shelter yesterday, VERY uncooperative! Refused to entertain the idea of turning any dogs over to a rescue person. Went so far as to tell me that ALL purebred dogs are adopted out, I know personally this is NOT true. Just placed a nice yellow lab with a family that was on her last day.

I then called my local Assistant County Manager, he states; " I don't see where you could do anymore than our animal control facility, and SPCA are already doing"! I explained the basic fundamentals of rescue, ie: required spay/neuter prior to placement, home checks, reference checks etc., and that the shelter has no feasible way of knowing, what happens to the dog, once someone pays their money and it leaves. He then went on to state: "once you have obtained your non-profit status, and have Incorporated, call me for an appointment, and you can make your plea to the county attorney." I asked him where I could obtain the information, and he told me to call the IRS??

Question number one; Whom do you call to find out how to apply for non-profit status?

Question number two: Would it just be more feasable to continue on our own, and forget about trying to start something?

All of the above prompted me to call the attorney who does all the legal stuff for the local no kill shelter this morning. He said he didn't believe that there would be any problem legally, if we just continued on our own, as long as we stayed within the county ordinances as to numbers of dogs allowed.

Now question number three: I saw postings referring to holding yard sales, bake sales, etc. So you do these as individuals, and only you know where the proceeds are going? I can see this for a yard sale, but in order to have a bake sale here, you must have current health certificates issued by the county health department, and a vendors liscense.

Right now I'm feeling a bit daunted. There is a real need in this area for an *all breed*, rescue network. I in the past 10 years have never backed down from a challenge, but must admit this appears to be a big hurdle. My personal feelings right now, are to continue making baby steps, until we can obtain a working network, and have something tangible to present. Any idea's, advice is greatly welcomed at this point:)

Mary

Mary JC Smith
MARCAL Labradors
mailto:lawns@earthlink.net
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Hills/7616/


Subject: Re: CLASS: Getting started
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 1998 14:06:48 -0500
From: "Marilee J. McClure" - mmcclure@KSUMAIL.KENNESAW.EDU

Mary JC Smith wrote:

Question number one; Whom do you call to find out how to apply for non-profit status?

The Metro Atlanta Great Pyrenees Club just received their incorporation so maybe I can help here. You need to get in touch with the Secretary of State's office in North Carolina and have them send you the forms and information for incorporating in your state (in Georgia, it meant filling out a form, drafting articles of incorporation (which we actually got from our code of ethics) and placing a statement in the newspaper). After you have done that, you will need to file for a FEIN number with the federal government (form available from the IRS). You can file as a non-profit, but in order to receive 501(c)3 status (charitable institution), you have to fill out another set of forms, along with a very hefty fee (I think it is $420). If you don't, people who donate to you cannot take their donations as a charitable contribution. However, you will still be listed as a non-profit organization, even if you do not file as a charitable organization.

Question number two: Would it just be more feasable to continue on our own, and forget about trying to start something?

Although I know that a lot of groups are not incorporated, you would actually have more liability protection if you were incorporated. Also, in Georgia, a rescue group must have a license from the Dept. of Agriculture in order to do rescue. You can't get a license until you are incorporated and there are fines if you do rescue and get caught without a license. You might want to check with them.

Good luck.

Marilee McClure
Metro Atlanta Great Pyrenees Club
mmcclure@ksumail.kennesaw.edu


Subject: CLASS: Getting started
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 1998 15:26:20 -0400
From: Elizabeth Sommers - ESOMMERS@COURTS.STATE.NY.US

Also, in Georgia, a rescue group must have a license from the Dept. of Agriculture in order to do rescue.

This is fascinating. Could you give me some references (statutes, regulations, bill numbers) so that I could look into this further? Could well be the wave of the future, with both good and bad aspects -- the last time I "browsed around" I found more States were giving at least semi-official recognition to rescues as, for example, a lawful recipient of stray animals. This is the first "licensing," however.

Betsy Sommers
GRROWLS-NY
Golden Retriever rescue, Albany, NY


Subject: CLASS: Getting started
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 1998 14:36:44 -0500
From: Jill Blasdel - jillblas@HSONLINE.NET

Mary JC Smith wrote:

Question number one; Whom do you call to find out how to apply for non-profit status?

The Metro Atlanta Great Pyrenees Club just received their incorporation so maybe I can help here. You need to get in touch with the Secretary of State's office in North Carolina

Also, in Georgia, a rescue group must have a license from the Dept. of Agriculture in order to do rescue

Mary or anyone else,

Do you know if you are a multi-state organization if you must incorporate in every state that you are functioning from or can you have a central location that is non-profit and function from wherever?

Is the Dept. of Ag. license a normal procedure or is that unusual?

TIA,

Jill Blasdel
Dachshund rescue
Greensburg, IN
DUR / CUR #393
jillblas@hsonline.net


Subject: Re: CLASS: questions for potential vets
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 1998 09:59:10 -0500
From: Beth Goelzer Lyons - bgl1@CORNELL.EDU

We decided to use the same vet that we use for our own dogs -- Colonial Vet Hospital in Ithaca, NY. The prices aren't discounted much, but there are some other services that have been very important to us.

  • full-service; certified by American Animal Hospital Assoc.
  • several vets
  • terrific hours; easy to get appts. (even same day)
  • telephone support without charge (including after hours)
  • overnight boarding for spay/neuter
  • willing to write prescriptions so that we can order drugs by mail
Special services that we get for our rescue program:
  • free medicated bath
  • free nail clipping
  • separate Tavi Border Collie Rescue file
  • 30-day account
  • account set up to accept direct donations from our benefactors (including by credit card)
  • feedback about how the dogs behaved while in their care
  • referrals of prospective adopters
What we'd really like is for these vets to agree to do standard hip X-rays during the spay/neuter, but they firmly believe in the Penn-Hip method, which is beyond our reach. Other than that, we have been very happy with the quality of care and service.

We have listed them on our web site and also in our newsletters. I'm not sure how much promotional value they actually get, because many of our dogs are adopted out of their area. But that's who we recommend whenever anyone in our area asks for a vet, so they're at least getting that much.

Beth Goelzer Lyons - Tavi@bcrescue.org
Tavi Border Collie Rescue
Serving New York State and beyond
Tele. 607 275-0282 (evenings)
http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/cgl1/TBCR/


Subject: CLASS: upcoming topics
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 1998 11:34:28 +0000
From: Pam Bishop - dobra@pe.net

Classmembers......

We are getting ahead of ourselves....Each week we will be talking in depth about different subjects regarding dog rescue. This week we are just hitting on some basic things. Next with we will start with FORMS & PAPERWORK

Some of the other subjects will be:

  • Working with shelters
  • Working with puppy mills
  • Training and problems with rescue dogs
  • Working with forms and paperwork
  • Placing senior dogs
  • Screening - dogs and homes
  • Working with breeders
  • Health problems
  • Advertising and Promotion
  • Independent or with a club
  • Time management
  • Rescue dogs vs your dogs
If your questions are about these subjects, please wait until we get to that week. Then we can go in real detail about them. If you have other subjects that you'd like to see covered, please contact me at: dog-rescue-request@apple.ease.lsoft.com put the word CLASS in the subject line.

If you miss some of the posts or have friends that want to join late, all posts to the CLASS are being put up on the dog rescue website at:

http://www.geocities.com/heartland/estates/3528

Hope you enjoy the classes.

Pam Bishop
listowner


Subject: Re: CLASS: Getting started
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 1998 15:35:58 -0500
From: "Marilee J. McClure" - mmcclure@KSUMAIL.KENNESAW.EDU

This is fascinating. Could you give me some references (statutes, regulations, bill numbers) so that I could look into this further?

The Animal Protection Act was established in 1987 due to great concern about puppy mills in the state. The act regulates pet dealers, breeders, kennels and animal shelters by outlining guidelines and standards which these establishments must follow. The animal protection section regulates the selling, boarding, and humane sheltering of companion pets from puppies, kittens and exotic birds to reptiles and pot bellied pigs.

Hope that helps. If you need more info, let me know and I will be glad to get back to you with something more concrete if I can.

Marilee McClure
Metro Atlanta Great Pyrenees Club, Inc.
mmcclure@ksumail.kennesaw.edu


Subject: Re: CLASS: Getting started
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 1998 17:50:01 -0400
From: Mary JC Smith - lawns@earthlink.net

Mary or anyone else,

Do you know if you are a multi-state organization if you must incorporate in every state that you are functioning from or can you have a central location that is non-profit and function from wherever?

I don't have any answers for you on this one. As I have found things are different from County to County, let alone crossing state lines. When my county was under Rabies quarantine, you couldn't cross the county line, without proof that the rabies was current. I would imagine that you would have to know, what each individual county, and states regulations are. Kind of like when I cross state lines with horses, or dogs, each state has it's own requirements.

Is the Dept. of Ag license a normal procedure or is that unusual?

This was something Marilee suggested I look into in my quest for knowledge:)....BTW, I did call the local Department of Agriculture, they stated I needed to get in touch with the USDA, on the Federal level, they only deal with *plants*:))

Mary JC Smith
MARCAL Labradors
mailto:lawns@earthlink.net
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Hills/7616/


Subject: CLASS: Getting started
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 1998 15:12:11 -0700
From: boreas - boreas@NETWRX.NET

There is a book that you can purchase for approximately $50 that gives you all the information that you should need to become a 501(c) (3). It is entitled. "How to Form a Nonprofit Corporation" by Anthony Mancuso. Even if you use an attorney the book is a wealth of information. The number for you to call is (919) 733-5172.

We in Arizona had to run our Articles in the newspaper for three consecutive issues. That was very expensive, I think it was $425. Our filing fee for the IRS was only $150. There were other cost too.

Remember all States have different laws. It looks like North Carolina may be less expensive because you only need to record a certified copy of your Articles with the register of deeds in the county your corporate headquarters will be located.

I would definitely go for it. Being a 501 (c) (3) can make a world of difference in not only getting donations but having a better working relationship with shelters and pounds.

Victoria Kremer
http://personal.netwrx.net/boreas/southwes.htm
SWOESR, Inc.
(602) 391-0999
Old English Sheepdogs


Subject: CLASS: Getting started
Date: Thu, 3 Sep 1998 15:21:36 -0700
From: boreas - boreas@NETWRX.NET

You must incorporate in any state you do business in.

We just extended our nonprofit to include Texas. It was fairly easy to do and was not expensive at all. Just be careful about each state laws concerning franchise tax and selling items. Your best bet is when you are a 501 (c) (3) send a written letter to your State and ask for a tax exempt status determination from them. The send another letter to the state clarify if you must pay tax on items you sell.

Victoria Kremer
http://personal.netwrx.net/boreas/southwes.htm
SWOESR, Inc.
(602) 391-0999
Old English Sheepdogs


End of Day Four

Day Five








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